Tutorial | Grandma’s Skirt to Blouse

Let me begin with my inspiration. While skimming vintage ads I ran across this:

Find more of the “wrapped clothing” series
in the LIFE Archives.

You Will Need:
1. Fabric (Mine measured 56×34 inches. However, you can judge this based on your size and the length you prefer. This was more than enough for the shirt and strap.)
2. Sewing Machine
3. Scissors
4. Fabric Marker or pencil
5. Something round for the neck-cutout

Here’s the skirt from my grandmother:

And here it is after I took it apart. You will notice the pocket holes. I eventually sewed them closed.

Fold your fabric in half. The open end will be the bottom of the shirt, while the closed end will be the neck area.

{Excuse my feet…hehe} This next part depends on how long you want your shirt AND how big you want your straps. I recommend each strap measuring at least 2.5 inches or more. I ended up cutting more after I sewed the first strap on. I wanted a thicker bow.

You will then hem all sides on the straps. My hem varied on each side. You basically want the straps to look nice and not frayed.

I have finished hemming at this point. Not perfect but I’m learning.

Now sew the ends of the straps together to make one long strap. You pick the ends, it doesn’t matter.

Sew strap along the base of the BACK flap. In other words, the strap should be attached to the flap that will cover your back, jack. (lol… I had to… ooooook moving on)

This is what you should have after you’ve sewn the strap on.

Go to the closed end of your fabric and at the center make a neck hole. I also wanted a deep ‘V’; you can do as much or as little as you like. You may not want you back out so only cut the top flap, etc. etc.

Cut out your design and hem the edges as so:
(Notice I added two small straps near the middle of the front flap. That is to keep the shirt in place when I put it on. You’ll see what I mean once you put yours on. You may or may not need this.

And that’s all folks!

Simple enough? Leave me some feedback!

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Tutorial | Grandmother’s Cream Blouse

Make sure to view the after photo’s.

This tutorial is easy. I’m a beginner and I finished it in an hour. (Please excuse the poor picture quality)

Tools:

  1. Blouse. There are tons of these at thrift stores for dirt cheap.
  2. Pins
  3. Sewing Machine (Although very possible to do by hand)

Here’s the blouse BEFORE alterations:

Step 1:
- Remove buttons.
- Fold flaps inward to achieve the following.

Step 2:
- Flip shirt inside out and then in half. Shoulders on top of shoulders and flaps on top of flaps, as so.
- Pin flaps.

Step 3:
- I placed a pencil to show where the bottom of the V will be.
- Sew along the flap from the bottom of the blouse to the pencil.

Step 4:
-Flip blouse right side out and your done!

Final:

Was this helpful? I hope you enjoyed this tutorial.

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Business Card-esque

In limbo, I’m without business cards.  Rule of thumb/word to the wise, when without the funds get ultra-creative. Side note: According to correlated.org,” 69 percent of people who have business cards have gotten a speeding ticket, compared with 53 percent of people in general.”

Materials:

cardstock

printer

scraps of fabric

scissors/X-Acto knife

needle and thread (although super glue may have worked).

The “plain Jane” ones were just okay. They needed a little more (insert descriptive noun). I’ll keep a few of them on hand for a more casual encounter (not to be taken personally).

casualEncounter: “Lets exchange numbers.”

Me: “Sure, take a not so happenin’ card.”

All in all, these turned out beautifully! The inconsistencies add much needed character.

Now to make a case.  hmmmm?

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Tutorial | Flipped Cream Blouse

Let me start by saying this takes some time IF you are a beginner like me.

Before you start looking at the pictures, although I’m sure you have already done so, it is best to visualize the process in your own words. I say this because there may be a better or easier way to do this.

Tools:

  1. Thrifted blouse with  pizzazz (random noun…I know)
  2. Pins
  3. Chalk for tracing (Although I used a pencil. HAHA. Can you tell I’m a beginner)
  4. Scissors and/or a Seam Ripper
  5. Sewing Machine (Although very possible to do by hand)

This is a plain polyester blend blouse. It is non-stretchy, which means it took me a couple trys to make it the right size.

This is the back. As you can see, it has some great detail. Right up my style alley!

I found a shirt that fit me, placed it on top, and traced. Again, because the blouse is polyester, and I used a cotton tee for tracing, I had to add about an inch to the trace line. This was definitely trial and error. The first time I did this, my husband had to help me out of the shirt. Scary.

Next I cut out the sleeves, shoulder pads (will use later), and the shoulder seams. I folded and pinned the flaps of fabric so that it would be ready for sewing. (See next image)

After pinning the front flaps, I cut the shape of the back as so. Again, I pinned the flaps of fabric down in preparation for sewing. Is this clear?

My final results.

-Please let me know if you’re stuck. I will be happy to help.

Send me a pic if you completed this one.

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